Becoming Beloved Community

Becoming Beloved Community represents not so much a set of programs as a journey, a set of interrelated commitments around which Episcopalians may organize our many efforts to respond to racial injustice and grow a community of reconcilers, justice-makers, and healers. The labyrinth may be an even more useful image for engaging the vision. On the road toward reconciliation and healing, we move around corners and double back into quadrants we have visited before, each time discovering new revelation and challenge.

 
Screenshot (30).png
 

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry offers a message on the church’s work for racial healing

 
 
 

Join us on a journey to build Beloved Community at the Cathedral.

Through prayer and conversation, we have discerned the first steps for this journey at the Cathedral. Our desire is to provide formation experiences to a variety of parishioners. You are invited to join in where you feel called to both do the personal work of unpacking injustice as well as find community in doing the work with others. For more information about these offerings, or if you have questions, contact Canon Paige Hanks.

BBCFormationHour (1).png

Are you curious about this movement? Visit episcopalchurch.org/beloved-community to find out more about the commitment of the Episcopal church to racial healing, reconciliation and justice.

_Seeing White_ discussion group (1).png

Mondays, 6:00-7:00 pm | Oct 7 - Nov 11

Led by Canon Paige Hanks, the Seeing White discussion group will meet for 7 weeks. The podcast can be found here: www.sceneonradio.org/seeing-white

Let us know you plan to join the discussion by registering here. This is not required, but very helpful as we plan!

WebSacred Ground.png

Please consider participating in this diocesan-wide event, designed to create space for difficult but respectful and transformative dialogue on race and racism. Registration is available online.

You can discover more about the Sacred Ground series here: episcopalchurch.org/sacred-ground

Join our Twitter chat!

follow along with @spcathedral on Mondays at 8:00 pm, starting September 30

BBCPrayer.png

Resources for Individuals & Congregations

Becoming Beloved Community…Where You Are was created by the Episcopal Church. This document provides detail about the four commitments as well as books, articles, and reflections on how to further examine racial healing and injustice in your community.

We acknowledge this is hard work.

We are asking ourselves and each other to reexamine stories and truths that are deeply held. We also acknowledge that we are called by God and our baptismal vows to do this work. We approach this work with a sense of curiosity and understanding that we don’t have all the answers and are sometimes limited by own own life experiences. Below are links to books, articles, films, and online resources to help us learn and reflect as preparation for wider discussion.



Local Resources and Events

The African American Heritage Trails in St. Petersburg
The African American Heritage Trails in St. Petersburg, Florida, are walking tours of downtown neighborhoods. They provide individuals, groups, and classes with an overview of African American influence on the history of the city. Nineteen markers covering more than a dozen city blocks provide details about the history of the African American community in St. Petersburg.

Dr. G. Carter Woodson African American Museum
The museum presents the historic voice of one segment of the St. Petersburg Florida community in the perspective of local, regional, and national history, culture and community. It is another demonstration of the commitment to revitalize the Midtown St. Petersburg area.

Not Giving Up: Maintaining our Commitment to Justice in Unjust Times
Thursday, October 24th at 7:30pm
Fox Hall at Eckerd College

Tim Wise—a world-renowned anti-racist educator, commentator and author of Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America—will speak on the importance of staying strong in difficult times and committing to the struggle for justice, even when justice seems far away. Weaving social movement history with contemporary analysis, humor and storytelling, Wise will provide practical tools for movement building, self-care, how to build effective coalitions, and how to avoid some of the pitfalls that occasionally befall organizers and activists in every generation. In this talk, Wise also will examine the ups and downs of social media as a tool for movement building; the importance (and potential blind spots) of movement allies; and understanding the difference between systems of oppression and individuals who occasionally act in oppressive ways—how to stay focused principally on the former as a way to lessen the harms of both. Additionally, he will explore the importance of “radical humility” in movement work: recognizing our own mistakes, our own (often slow) process of becoming aware of injustices, and that we still have much to learn from one another. This presentation is a great primer for movement building and effective activism, which will help boost the resilience of those seeking a more just and equitable world but who find themselves frustrated by the slow—often backward—pace of change.

How to Be an Antiracist | A Book Talk and Signing with Ibram X. Kendi
Friday, November 22 at 6:30 pm
University of Tampa, Plant Hall, Fletcher Lounge

From the National Book Award-winning author of Stamped from the Beginning comes a bracingly original approach to understanding and uprooting racism and inequality in our society—and in ourselves.

Ibram X. Kendi’s concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America—but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to be an Antiracist, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it.