Sep
24
6:30 PM18:30

St Peter's Book Club

SeptemberSPBC.png

The St. Peter’s Book Club will discuss science writer Robert M. Sapolsky’s A Primate’s Memoir at its meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 24, in the Chapter Room.

An exhilarating account of Sapolsky’s 21-year study of a troupe of rambunctious baboons in Kenya, A Primate’s Memoir interweaves serious scientific observations with wry commentary about the challenges and pleasures of living in the wilds of the Serengeti — for man and beast alike. Over two decades, Sapolsky survives culinary atrocities, gunpoint encounters, and a surreal kidnapping, while witnessing the encroachment of the tourist mentality on the farthest vestiges of unspoiled Africa.

Also at this meeting the group will choose the books for discussion in the months ahead. All welcome, whether you’ve read the book or not. The lively discussion may encourage you to do so! Roberta Poellein (rplln37@gmail.com) is happy to provide details.

View Event →
Sep
25
6:00 PM18:00

Reader's Theatre

ReadersTheater (1).png

Another season, another show! Our Reader’s Theatre group will start its weekly classes and rehearsals on Wednesday, September 25, from 6 to 7:30 p.m., working up to a performance December 18.

Retired professional director and choreographer Jack Clark teaches this class in speech, movement, and performance. Readers stay “on book” rather than memorizing their parts. For the last several years they’ve entertained us with winter and spring performances of short skits and sketches and excerpts from longer works. If there is an actor in you eager to step on the stage, now’s your chance. Reach Jack at jackaclark@hotmail.com.

View Event →
Oct
2
6:00 PM18:00

Mourner's Path

Mourner's Path.png

Another season of our bereavement workshop, “Walking the Mourner’s Path,” begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, October 2. This is an eight-week course, led by trained facilitators, that helps those who have experienced a loss find peace and healing. Subsequent meetings will be on Tuesdays at a time convenient for the group. Please speak to Jerry Buchert (cbuchert@tampabay.rr.com, (727) 346-5286) or Anita Pernell-Arnold (arvapba8@aol.com or (727) 865-1388) for more information.

View Event →
Oct
3
2:00 PM14:00

Theater History and Performance

Theater History (1).png

Professional director and choreographer Jack Clark will use videos and scripts to look at relevant developments in the diverse characteristics of theater and its performance. This free class will meet from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Harvard Hall. No need to register; just come to any or all. Questions? jackaclark@ hotmail.com

  • October 3: The Birth of Tragedy: Ancient Greek Theater: Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles; The Trojan Women, by Euripides.

  • October 10: The Development of Comedy: Ancient Greek political comedy — Lysistrata, by Aristophanes; Ancient Roman sitcom — Miles Gloriosus (The Braggart Soldier), by Plautus; French 17th-century satire — Tartuffe, by Moliere.

  • October 17: 17th-Century Villains: the man — Iago in Othello, by William Shakespeare; the woman — BeatriceJoanna in The Changeling, by Thomas Middleton and William Rowley.

  • October 24: Female Victims and Feminists in the 19th Century: Miss Julie, by August Strindberg; A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen.

  • October 31: The American Tragic Hero: The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams; comparing Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman to August Wilson’s Fences.

View Event →
Oct
4
6:00 PM18:00

Oktoberfest

This event is free, but we need an accurate head count for food and drink. Please get your tickets at spcathedral.org/oktoberfest (This event is 21+ only. Child care is available for babies - age 11 with registration.)

This event is free, but we need an accurate head count for food and drink. Please get your tickets at spcathedral.org/oktoberfest (This event is 21+ only. Child care is available for babies - age 11 with registration.)

View Event →
Oct
6
9:00 AM09:00

Adult Formation

prayerbook.png

The Cathedral is going to use revised, expansive-language Rite II liturgies on Sundays at 10:15 am, beginning on October 13 and continuing through November 24. Before we begin, on October 6 from 9:00-10:00 am in Harvard Hall, the Rev. Canon Dr. Thomas Williams will do a presentation on the revisions, explaining the concerns that prompted them and discussing the details of the changes. After we have experienced the liturgies for a few weeks, he will seek your feedback. Is the more expansive language a help? An obstacle? Do the revised liturgies change the way you experience God in worship? This discussion is meant to be part of the larger discussion of our liturgical life that General Convention 2018 encouraged, and as a Cathedral parish we have a particular responsibility to provide leadership in conversations like these.

View Event →
Oct
8
12:00 PM12:00

Book Talk: Janet K. Keeler

OctoberBookTalk.png

Janet K. Keeler is a food journalist, podcaster, and coordinator of the Graduate Food Writing and Photography Certificate Program at USF St. Petersburg.
What's for dinner? The food we're eating tells a story of culture, race, politics, civil rights, and economics that reflects both history and headlines. "The Immigrant Cookbook: Recipes That Make America Great"
Free admission -- lunch available ($5)

View Event →
Oct
10
2:00 PM14:00

Theater History and Performance

Theater History (1).png

Professional director and choreographer Jack Clark will use videos and scripts to look at relevant developments in the diverse characteristics of theater and its performance. This free class will meet from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Harvard Hall. No need to register; just come to any or all. Questions? jackaclark@ hotmail.com

  • October 3: The Birth of Tragedy: Ancient Greek Theater: Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles; The Trojan Women, by Euripides.

  • October 10: The Development of Comedy: Ancient Greek political comedy — Lysistrata, by Aristophanes; Ancient Roman sitcom — Miles Gloriosus (The Braggart Soldier), by Plautus; French 17th-century satire — Tartuffe, by Moliere.

  • October 17: 17th-Century Villains: the man — Iago in Othello, by William Shakespeare; the woman — Beatrice Joanna in The Changeling, by Thomas Middleton and William Rowley.

  • October 24: Female Victims and Feminists in the 19th Century: Miss Julie, by August Strindberg; A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen.

  • October 31: The American Tragic Hero: The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams; comparing Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman to August Wilson’s Fences.

View Event →
Oct
13
9:00 AM09:00

My Favorite Piece of Scripture

My favorite piece of scripture (1).png

This fall our clergy will take turns sharing their favorite passage from the Bible. “We’re asking each of the clergy to take a deep dive into a passage that has been meaningful and formative to them in their priestly career,” Dean Morris said. “We’ll look at the language, at different translations, at what the original Greek or Hebrew said, where we see similar passages in the Bible, and how this passage has affected each of us, how we’ve used it in our teaching or preaching or pastoral care or our prayer or how we live our lives.”

View Event →
Oct
17
2:00 PM14:00

Theater History and Performance

Theater History.png

Professional director and choreographer Jack Clark will use videos and scripts to look at relevant developments in the diverse characteristics of theater and its performance. This free class will meet from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Harvard Hall. No need to register; just come to any or all. Questions? jackaclark@ hotmail.com

  • October 3: The Birth of Tragedy: Ancient Greek Theater: Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles; The Trojan Women, by Euripides.

  • October 10: The Development of Comedy: Ancient Greek political comedy — Lysistrata, by Aristophanes; Ancient Roman sitcom — Miles Gloriosus (The Braggart Soldier), by Plautus; French 17th-century satire — Tartuffe, by Moliere.

  • October 17: 17th-Century Villains: the man — Iago in Othello, by William Shakespeare; the woman — BeatriceJoanna in The Changeling, by Thomas Middleton and William Rowley.

  • October 24: Female Victims and Feminists in the 19th Century: Miss Julie, by August Strindberg; A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen.

  • October 31: The American Tragic Hero: The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams; comparing Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman to August Wilson’s Fences.

View Event →
Oct
20
9:00 AM09:00

My Favorite Piece of Scripture

My favorite piece of scripture (1).png

This fall our clergy will take turns sharing their favorite passage from the Bible. “We’re asking each of the clergy to take a deep dive into a passage that has been meaningful and formative to them in their priestly career,” Dean Morris said. “We’ll look at the language, at different translations, at what the original Greek or Hebrew said, where we see similar passages in the Bible, and how this passage has affected each of us, how we’ve used it in our teaching or preaching or pastoral care or our prayer or how we live our lives.”

View Event →
Oct
24
2:00 PM14:00

Theater History and Performance

Theater History (1).png

Professional director and choreographer Jack Clark will use videos and scripts to look at relevant developments in the diverse characteristics of theater and its performance. This free class will meet from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Harvard Hall. No need to register; just come to any or all. Questions? jackaclark@ hotmail.com

  • October 3: The Birth of Tragedy: Ancient Greek Theater: Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles; The Trojan Women, by Euripides.

  • October 10: The Development of Comedy: Ancient Greek political comedy — Lysistrata, by Aristophanes; Ancient Roman sitcom — Miles Gloriosus (The Braggart Soldier), by Plautus; French 17th-century satire — Tartuffe, by Moliere.

  • October 17: 17th-Century Villains: the man — Iago in Othello, by William Shakespeare; the woman — BeatriceJoanna in The Changeling, by Thomas Middleton and William Rowley.

  • October 24: Female Victims and Feminists in the 19th Century: Miss Julie, by August Strindberg; A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen.

  • October 31: The American Tragic Hero: The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams; comparing Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman to August Wilson’s Fences.

View Event →
Oct
27
9:00 AM09:00

My Favorite Piece of Scripture

My favorite piece of scripture (1).png

This fall our clergy will take turns sharing their favorite passage from the Bible. “We’re asking each of the clergy to take a deep dive into a passage that has been meaningful and formative to them in their priestly career,” Dean Morris said. “We’ll look at the language, at different translations, at what the original Greek or Hebrew said, where we see similar passages in the Bible, and how this passage has affected each of us, how we’ve used it in our teaching or preaching or pastoral care or our prayer or how we live our lives.”

View Event →
Oct
31
2:00 PM14:00

Theater History and Performance

Theater History (1).png

Professional director and choreographer Jack Clark will use videos and scripts to look at relevant developments in the diverse characteristics of theater and its performance. This free class will meet from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Harvard Hall. No need to register; just come to any or all. Questions? jackaclark@ hotmail.com

  • October 3: The Birth of Tragedy: Ancient Greek Theater: Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles; The Trojan Women, by Euripides.

  • October 10: The Development of Comedy: Ancient Greek political comedy — Lysistrata, by Aristophanes; Ancient Roman sitcom — Miles Gloriosus (The Braggart Soldier), by Plautus; French 17th-century satire — Tartuffe, by Moliere.

  • October 17: 17th-Century Villains: the man — Iago in Othello, by William Shakespeare; the woman — BeatriceJoanna in The Changeling, by Thomas Middleton and William Rowley.

  • October 24: Female Victims and Feminists in the 19th Century: Miss Julie, by August Strindberg; A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen.

  • October 31: The American Tragic Hero: The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams; comparing Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman to August Wilson’s Fences.

View Event →

Sep
22
4:45 PM16:45

Evensong

SeptEvensong (1).png

The Cathedral Chamber Choir will sing the service in B-flat by Howard Helvey. Born in 1968, Helvey resides in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he is active as a composer, arranger, and pianist, and serves as organist and choirmaster of historic Calvary Episcopal Church. He is also co-founder (2013) and conductor of the Cincinnati Fusion Ensemble, a professional chamber choir. You can listen to Helvey’s “Magnificat” and “Nunc dimittis” here: https://soundcloud.com/hergenfluet/howard-helvey-evening-canticles-in-b-flat-magnificat-and-nunc-dimittis An organ prelude is at 4:45 p.m. Dwight Thomas is director and organist.

View Event →
Sep
22
9:00 AM09:00

My Favorite Piece of Scripture

My favorite piece of scripture (1).png

This fall our clergy will take turns sharing their favorite passage from the Bible. “We’re asking each of the clergy to take a deep dive into a passage that has been meaningful and formative to them in their priestly career,” Dean Morris said. “We’ll look at the language, at different translations, at what the original Greek or Hebrew said, where we see similar passages in the Bible, and how this passage has affected each of us, how we’ve used it in our teaching or preaching or pastoral care or our prayer or how we live our lives.”

View Event →
Sep
19
5:45 PM17:45

Foyer Dinner Groups

SepFoyers.png

Consider Yourself Part of the Family: Join the Foyer Groups!

The foyer in a home is always a place of welcome.  Whether you are new to St. Peter’s or a longstanding member, one of the best ways to get to know others in our church is through Foyer groups. Each group consists of eight to 10 people who gather on an informal basis once a month to share a simple meal cooked by Chefs Jack, Marion and Richard. We meet on the third Thursday of the month, September through May, from 5:45 to 7 p.m. in Harvard Hall. Cost of the meal is $5.

We invite everyone who would like to participate in Foyer groups for the 2019-2020 year to fill in a form available on the activities table in Harvard Hall. We welcome singles and couples of all generations. You will be randomly grouped with others and will stay in your assigned group for the year. Couples are assigned to different groups. If you don't drive at night, we can arrange transportation by someone in your group.

The menu for each month's dinner is e-mailed to you in advance so you know what to expect. Or you are welcome to bring your own brown-bag dinner. Come join us as we form new relationships and reconnect with others. Our first meeting is September 19. Don't hesitate to contact Marion Fleming at mimideeda@gmail.com if you have questions.

View Event →
Sep
15
9:00 AM09:00

My Favorite Piece of Scripture

My favorite piece of scripture (1).png

This fall our clergy will take turns sharing their favorite passage from the Bible. “We’re asking each of the clergy to take a deep dive into a passage that has been meaningful and formative to them in their priestly career,” Dean Morris said. “We’ll look at the language, at different translations, at what the original Greek or Hebrew said, where we see similar passages in the Bible, and how this passage has affected each of us, how we’ve used it in our teaching or preaching or pastoral care or our prayer or how we live our lives.”

View Event →
Sep
8
8:00 PM20:00

Sung Compline

SungCompline.png

Beginning Sunday, September 8, we will offer a new service — the sung Office of Compline — on the second Sunday of the month. With a candlelit church and a quartet of our Cathedral staff singers, and in heartfelt prayer, we offer thanks to God in the stillness for the blessings of the day. The service lasts about half an hour. Its emphasis on rest, spiritual peace, and contemplation makes this an ideal service for the end of one busy week before the next one starts. For more information, visit spcathedral.org/music-events

View Event →
Sep
1
11:30 AM11:30

Sunday Social

SeptSocial.png

We're taking a break from the heat! Grown-ups and kids, join us in Harvard Hall following worship for fun with puzzles and games for all ages. This is a great opportunity to get to know other Cathedral families and catch up with friends. See you there!

View Event →
Aug
27
6:30 PM18:30

St. Peter's Book Club

AugustBook.png

Art historians have known for years that many works by the Italian baroque painter Caravaggio (1571-1610) have been lost to time. Somewhere — in a storeroom, in a small parish church, hanging above a fireplace — a masterpiece lies forgotten, mistaken for a copy. Author Jonathan Harr embarks on a spellbinding journey to discover the long-lost painting known as The Taking of Christ. Its mysterious fate and the circumstances of its disappearance have captivated Caravaggio devotees for years. In The Lost Painting, a young art historian stumbles across a clue in a dusty archive and tracks the painting across a continent and hundreds of years in history. But it is not until she meets an art restorer working in Ireland that she finally manages to assemble all the pieces of the puzzle.

View Event →
Aug
2
7:00 PM19:00

Burns' Movie Night

My Architect: A Son’s Journey (2003, NR) Documentarian Nathaniel Kahn examines the life and career of his father, architect Louis I. Kahn (1904- 1974), whose work included the Salk Institute, countless office buildings and private homes, and the parliament and capitol buildings in Bangladesh. The Oscar-nominated film reveals that the elder Kahn died of a heart attack in a Penn Station restroom, unidentified and broke despite having been one of the most influential architects of the twentieth century.

Aug2Burns.png
View Event →
Jul
27
6:00 PM18:00

Tropical Trivia Night

Trivia Night (2).png

Have some tropical fun on a hot summer evening at our Tropical Trivia Night. Our great professional trivia host, Lee, will be back to lead us in another fun-filled evening of brain teasers and memory-joggers. We assign the teams that evening, so no ringers, sorry!

We'll have Cuban sandwiches, black beans, and mango punch to set the theme. Because we are also serving beer and wine, this event is open only to those 21 and older, please.

Tickets are $10 and are sold online beginning July 7 and during coffee hour in Harvard Hall on Sundays, July 7, 12 and 21.

View Event →
Jul
26
7:00 PM19:00

Burns' Movie Night

COLD COMFORT INN (1995, PG). When Flora Poste (Kate Beckinsale), a young society woman in 1930s London, becomes suddenly orphaned, she's forced to take up residence with a group of her unsophisticated, oddball relatives at their farm. Despite protests from the bedridden, iron-willed matriarch of the farm, the aspiring lass tries to achieve some semblance of order and class in the house---and in her own life. Cast also includes Eileen Atkins, Ian McKlellan and Joanna Lumley.

COLD COMFORT INN (1995, PG). When Flora Poste (Kate Beckinsale), a young society woman in 1930s London, becomes suddenly orphaned, she's forced to take up residence with a group of her unsophisticated, oddball relatives at their farm. Despite protests from the bedridden, iron-willed matriarch of the farm, the aspiring lass tries to achieve some semblance of order and class in the house---and in her own life. Cast also includes Eileen Atkins, Ian McKlellan and Joanna Lumley.

View Event →
Jul
19
7:00 PM19:00

Burns' Movie Night

Once a key technology in business and literature, manual typewriters are viewed by most people as quaint 20th century artifacts. But as this engaging documentary reveals, hardcore typewriter fans are ensuring that these predigital marvels live on.

Once a key technology in business and literature, manual typewriters are viewed by most people as quaint 20th century artifacts. But as this engaging documentary reveals, hardcore typewriter fans are ensuring that these predigital marvels live on.

View Event →