Lent at the Cathedral


 

Daily Meditation

 



Sunday, april 21 | Easter sunday

Now it was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the other women who told this to the apostles. But these words seemed to them an idle tale, and they did not believe them. - Luke 24:10-11

So, Jesus’ closest friends, the ones who knew him best and admired his ministry the most, did not believe the women who told of the resurrection after their return from the empty tomb. Maybe they rolled their eyes at one another. Perhaps they made comments like, “that’s interesting, ladies, but we know better…stuff like that does not happen.”

There are people all around us and within the church who think like those apostles did. And that’s perfectly fine. Because those same apostles, who sat rolling their eyes, later became ardent evangelists who gave their lives for the sake of the gospel. It can happen to any of us, too. All it takes is an encounter with the Risen One. It happens every day on the road, in the breaking of bread…in the most ordinary of places. It will happen to you if you are open to it. Eye rollin’ and all!

— The Very Rev. Stephen Morris

Daily Scripture Readings for Sunday, April 21: Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24; Acts 10:34-43; 1 Corinthians 15:19-26; Luke 24:1-12


Friday, APRIL 19, 2019

So Jesus came out, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe. Pilate said to them, “Here is the man.”

Those of us with long memories will recall those words a little differently: “Behold the man!” Nobody says “behold” anymore, so the word has been banished even from the liturgical reading of Scripture; but perhaps you’ll let me have “behold,” just for today.

“Behold the man!” What Pilate means is something like this: “Oh, look at the poor fellow.” He means to express pity and contempt: pity for this beaten, bruised, bleeding wretch; contempt for the chief priests who see in this weakling—this man who can’t even be bothered to defend himself—a threat to their power.

But his words say more than he means. “Behold the man!” It’s not just “Look at this guy.” It’s “Behold human being itself, its fulfillment and perfection, not as an abstract ideal, not as a pious hope, but incarnate in this flesh and these bones, bleeding real blood, suffering real pain, and enacting real obedience at an unimaginable cost.”

Christ, as William Porcher DuBose said, is “the truth and the fulfillment of every” human being, and so there is “no higher act of ourselves, or exercise of our personality, than in becoming and being no longer ourselves, but Christ.” Yet too often I would rather be myself, rather claim any identity but his, than bow my head to his easy yoke. And it is my own self-assertion, or my own self-negation, that laid on him the burden that he willingly bore:

‘Twas I, Lord Jesus.
I it was denied thee.
I crucified thee.

But all of that was crucified with him, and it is dead to me, and I to it, if only I will take hold of that perfect humanity, which, having done all it was commanded to do, pronounced in the voice of the great high priest the great Amen: “It is finished, accomplished, done to perfection.”

What he has been for us, he wants also to be in us and with us: the perfect human life, divinely lived. Behold the man!

— The Rev. Canon Dr. Thomas Williams

Daily Scripture Readings for Friday, April 19: Psalm 69:1-23(24-30)31-38, 73; Isaiah 52:13-53:12; Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9; John 18:1-19:42





Holy Week

 
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Bishop Smith will preside at this service. The service will include foot washing, Eucharist, reservation of the Sacrament for Good Friday, and stripping of the altar. There will be a special children's chapel for ages 4-8 and nursery available for babies-age 4.

Bishop Smith will preside at this service. The service will include foot washing, Eucharist, reservation of the Sacrament for Good Friday, and stripping of the altar. There will be a special children's chapel for ages 4-8 and nursery available for babies-age 4.

Based on the scriptural warrant, “Could you not stay awake with me one hour?" all are invited for one hour of personal prayer and meditation following the Maundy Thursday service. Materials for personal meditation and prayer will be available in St. Mary's Chapel. You are also invited to keep vigil in your home.

Based on the scriptural warrant, “Could you not stay awake with me one hour?" all are invited for one hour of personal prayer and meditation following the Maundy Thursday service. Materials for personal meditation and prayer will be available in St. Mary's Chapel. You are also invited to keep vigil in your home.

 
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Parking reminder: please be aware that on weekdays you may not park in the lot across from the church unless there is a sign designating “Cathedral Parking.” The parking meters on all streets surrounding the Cathedral must be paid between 9:00am-6:00pm.